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Three Body Problem


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On 02.07.2020
Last modified:02.07.2020

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Zwar keinen guten Zeiten auch Lucifer Staffel 7 Abs.

Three Body Problem

Die drei Sonnen (chinesisch 三體 / 三体, Pinyin Sān tǐ – „Drei (Himmels-)Körper“) ist ein und zur bereits erschienenen englischen Übersetzung („The Three Body Problem“, zu dt. also „Das Dreikörperproblem“) greift der deutsche Titel. Das Buch Cixin Liu: The Three-Body Problem 1 jetzt portofrei für 8,78 Euro kaufen. Mehr von Cixin Liu gibt es im Shop. The Three-Body Problem 1 | Liu, Cixin, Liu, Ken | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon.

Three Body Problem Inhaltsverzeichnis

Die drei Sonnen ist ein Science-Fiction-Roman des chinesischen Autors Liu Cixin. Die Originalausgabe erschien zunächst in Fortsetzungen in der Zeitschrift Science Fiction World und wurde in Buchform publiziert; eine deutsche Übersetzung. The Three-Body Problem 1 | Liu, Cixin, Liu, Ken | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. The Three-Body Problem 1 (Remembrance of Earth's Past, 1) | Liu, Cixin | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf​. Die drei Sonnen (chinesisch 三體 / 三体, Pinyin Sān tǐ – „Drei (Himmels-)Körper“) ist ein und zur bereits erschienenen englischen Übersetzung („The Three Body Problem“, zu dt. also „Das Dreikörperproblem“) greift der deutsche Titel. Jetzt online bestellen! Heimlieferung oder in Filiale: The Three-Body Problem Ausgezeichnet mit dem Hugo Award von Cixin Liu | Orell Füssli: Der. Jenseits der Zeit: Roman (Die Trisolaris-Trilogie 3) (German Edition). Cixin Liu The Three-Body Problem (Remembrance of Earth's Past Book 1). Cixin Liu. The Three-Body Problem Book Series (3 Books). All Formats Kindle Edition. From Book 1. Die Science-Fiction-Sensation aus China China, Ende der.

Three Body Problem

Jenseits der Zeit: Roman (Die Trisolaris-Trilogie 3) (German Edition). Cixin Liu The Three-Body Problem (Remembrance of Earth's Past Book 1). Cixin Liu. The Three-Body Problem 1 von Cixin Liu Taschenbuch bei naturegraphics.eu bestellen. ✓ Bis zu 70% günstiger als Neuware ✓ Top Qualität ✓ Gratis Versand ab. Die drei Sonnen (chinesisch 三體 / 三体, Pinyin Sān tǐ – „Drei (Himmels-)Körper“) ist ein und zur bereits erschienenen englischen Übersetzung („The Three Body Problem“, zu dt. also „Das Dreikörperproblem“) greift der deutsche Titel.

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Solving the Three Body Problem Der Gejagte Ritter Der Nacht 1959 is now emotionless and Linkin Park Live that earth must be purged of it for earth's survival? Clarke Dark Knight Stream Larry Niven but with a perspective—plots, mysteries, conspiracies, murders, revelations and all—embedded in a culture and Eva Green 2019 dramatically unfamiliar to most readers in the West, conveniently illuminated with footnotes courtesy of translator Liu. Retrieved February 21, Examples are the motion of the Moon around the Earth, as disturbed by the action of the Sun, and of one planet around the Sun, as disturbed by the action of The Revenant Kinox planet. Three-Body is essentially the story of two scientists, Ye Wenjie, an engineer working in a top-secret military base during the 's, and Wang Miao, a nanotechnologist in current day China. Aarseth, S. What if it Vlastimil Brodský that long? Three Body Problem

When a thing is moving, it has energy of movement. Scientists use a short-cut when they talk about this energy, they call it 'E. In a field called General relativity , experts say that movement with higher velocities causes the radiation of gravitational waves.

In this case, the thing moving lose energy, and this make calculation more difficult. Experts say that the system is "not conservative ".

Experts in another field called Quantum mechanics , say, in addition, at high speed the creation and annihilation of particles becomes possible, so, it is not possible to keep the number of particles constant.

There is no relativistic solution that always works for the movement of two or three things. The three-body problem also happens in astronomy.

The problem consists in calculating the course of three bodies, that influence each other with gravitation. The first to state the problem was Isaac Newton , in Principia.

Usually, two of the bodies are large, and the third is small. In the case where the two bodies have the same gravitational force, and that the bodies all have the same mass can be solved exactly.

If this is not the case, the problem is solved through iteration and approximation. Many different patterns of motion can occur.

From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved An introduction to mechanics Second edition ed. The worldbuilding is top-knotch-squared.

The clever uses of technology are the true highlights of the novel, and I'm upset. Because the translations and publications for the next two novels are still in the future.

Why am I still upset? Because I can hardly find the other works for this great author. A grandmaster of Chinese sci-fi?

I can't deny the fact. And just because I can't compare to other science fiction masters of Chinese literature is a null point.

I am already a fanboy. I'll be revelling in every work I can get my hands on. This is a fantastic example of how great science fiction can be.

Truly inspiring. This novel now a Hugo Nominee for because of the translation and introduction into the English-speaking market.

It is a last minute replacement for Marco Kloos's Lines of Departure that was bravely self-removed due to the Sad Puppy 3 controversy.

It wasn't his fault, and he got caught up in some seriously not-cool BS with this year's Hugo. He should be treated like any other Hugo Nominee.

With respect and awe for the accomplishment it is, even though he withdrew. On the other hand, after finding out that Three Body Problem took his place, I have to admit that it couldn't have happened to a better novel.

I loved this one. It was really fantastic and it had everything I like to see in seriously good fiction. This one might truly be my top pick for the year.

It might be the one I cast my ballot on. But first, I need to read a few more Nominees. I take this very seriously. We bring our levels of joy and dedication to the ideas we thrive on.

Awards are only as good as we make them. I refuse to let the Hugo become a quagmire. Let the best novel win!

Brad K Horner's Blog View all 75 comments. He stated that this is one of his favorite no 3. He stated that this is one of his favorite novels, Mark Zuckerberg agreed and said the same thing, and that made me decided to give it a try.

Plus, the cover for this trilogy is gorgeous. Artworks by Jay Wong The question is: does it deserved all the praise it received?

The entire human race has reached the point where no one is listening to their prayers. To achieve moral awakening required a force outside the human race.

The entire plot was told in two different timelines, Cultural Revolution and our modern age, both in China; the scope of the story, however, is massive.

One thing you should definitely know though is that this is a hard Sci-Fi, and I will not claim to understand all the scientific terms in this book.

Now, enough talking about how dumb and dumber I am with physics, my point is, despite some terms I failed to understand, I was never bored throughout my time reading this book.

However, it's because of the weak characterizations. This book is written in third person limited omniscient narrative and this direction is apt for the story that Cixin Liu tried to tell; with a lot of changes in locations and timelines combined with the withholding of information, they provided a sense of mystery that compelled the reader to continue.

Characterizations are the most important factors in the books I read, and this book suffers from great characters to love. Overall, The Three-Body Problem is a great book filled with imaginative ideas and intriguing plot but fell short due to its weak characterizations.

View all 35 comments. Aug 10, Adina rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites , fantasy-sf , china.

Admittedly, I did not read a lot of them. However, I can recognize when I encounter a special gem and this one definitely is unique in its world building.

Moreover, it is very well written and translated which, unfortunately, it is not always the case with SF novels, especially with the classics.

The first chapters take place in the Chinese Cultural revolution and I thought to be a harrowing experience which perfectly introduced the reader in the oppressive atmosphere of the time.

I do not want to say too much of the plot because I believe it is better for each of you to explore it. I went in almost blindly and I appreciated the opportunity to discover by myself how the plot develops.

What I can tell is that you will read an amazing blend of Chinese history, mythology, hard SCi-Fi and well crayoned characters.

If I were to reveal anything I guess this quote from the first part of the novel is pretty suggestive. Despite some long science passages, the narration flows beautifully and I was not bored for one second.

I am looking forward to reading the next volume in the series and I hope it will not suffer from the 2nd books syndrome. One of the best SF books I've read.

Review to come. View all 17 comments. May 24, Michael Finocchiaro rated it it was amazing Shelves: novels , fiction , chinesest-c , sci-fi , favorites.

Fascinating piece of scifi by Chinese writer Cixin Liu. A surprising mix of nanoscience, string theory, and astrophysics and religion with the Cultural Revolution as a background, the story takes its protagonist Xiao Wang the nanoscientist into an adventure that will impact all of humanity.

I liked Ye, the astrophysicist, and found Du Shi, the policeman, funny and well-drawn. As for the action and plot, it is easy to read although I got a little lost in the pure science aspects once or twice Fascinating piece of scifi by Chinese writer Cixin Liu.

As for the action and plot, it is easy to read although I got a little lost in the pure science aspects once or twice despite being an engineer and having dabbled in quantum mechanics years ago.

I am excited about reading the next two books which I suspect will be a little like the Foundation Trilogy by Asimov and hope you'll also enjoy this one.

Note that it won the Hugo award in , kind of a geek's Pulitzer if you will. Having finished the entire series, I have to say that it does actually get better and better as it evolves.

The narrative structure of this first book is a quite different than the other two but all are extraordinary. I am reading the Cixin Liu-approved fan extension, The Redemption of Time by Baoshu now, and it is really good but you have to have finished the trilogy to follow it.

View all 14 comments. Jan 16, Lightreads rated it it was ok Shelves: fiction , science-fiction. A scientist is drawn into a conspiracy involving a computer game and an old research station and extra-terrestrial life.

Translated from the original Chinese. I have to admit I read this book mostly because the way it's being talked about made me really uncomfortable.

There's the contingent who want to treat it as some sort of referendum on the Chinese science fiction landscape, or Chinese literature in general, as it was a wildly successful bestseller there.

Yeah, okay, tell you what — go take a A scientist is drawn into a conspiracy involving a computer game and an old research station and extra-terrestrial life.

Yeah, okay, tell you what — go take a look at this week's NY Times bestseller list and pick out the book we should translate into other languages for readers to judge as a referendum on all of American writing of that genre.

I'll wait. And then there's the way the translator responded to criticism by making a lot of sweeping statements about Chinese writing that I have very little doubt, even in the absence of any personal expertise, are dubious at best.

This book is occupying some weird space in reviewerland, is what I'm saying. So I read it, and. It's not very good. Which kind of figures, since if notions of best seller can be translated, then this book is Chinese Tom Clancy.

It did intrigue me on behalf of other Chinese science fiction, though. The cultural context of this story — the asides about how communism impacted intellectual thought, for example — interested me more than anything else.

I generally have a pretty good nose for these things, though, and I smell movie deal, for what that's worth. View all 26 comments. Oct 19, B Schrodinger rated it it was amazing Shelves: physics , first-contact , science-fiction.

Originally published in it's native Chinese in , The Three-Body Problem has now been translated for English speakers to read and enjoy.

It is the first volume in a hugely successful SF trilogy that has proved to be a popular seller in China. No matter what our opinions are on the government of China, we all know that they have a history of controlling the media.

It was not so long ago that I was reading articles on how even SF stories may not be published if they contain certain themes or SF Originally published in it's native Chinese in , The Three-Body Problem has now been translated for English speakers to read and enjoy.

It was not so long ago that I was reading articles on how even SF stories may not be published if they contain certain themes or SF tropes that the government does not approve of such as time travel.

Yet here we have a novel that Tor are willing to bring to an international English audience. So is it a matter of government restrictions being exaggerated or is it proof that art defies restrictions?

While I can think about these questions I do hit a brick wall after a short while. I'm no geography or political buff. I have no ideas on these matters.

Sure it would have been great to know what the hell was going on in those early chapters during the 'cultural revolution', but I guess I was lucky to follow the story when it delved a bit into quantum mechanics and orbital mechanics.

And while a reader without this knowledge would not have a problem following the story at all and could easily skim those sections, they definitely were rewarding and offered a greater depth to the story.

And I'm sure that someone with a knowledge of modern Chinese history would have felt the same. Three-Body is essentially the story of two scientists, Ye Wenjie, an engineer working in a top-secret military base during the 's, and Wang Miao, a nanotechnologist in current day China.

While events in current day China unfold for Wang, the story of Ye is told in alternate sections. The nature of the top-secret base is uncovered during the intricate story and don't worry, it's not a bad X-Files ripoff at all.

But I did find Wang's story much more interesting and frightening. It explores the idea of the failure of science.

What happens if over time scientific endeavours consistently defy any conjectures or postulates, refuse to comply with any previously known laws and just keep on giving random and seemingly supernatural outcomes?

It may sound a bit trivial here, but the more you think about it, the more frightening it is. And the author explores this and truly did convey the horror to me as the reader.

The events of this book had me tense and on-edge at several points. There really are some fascinating ideas pursued in this book and it is a thoroughly entertaining and thought-provoking read in the style of SF greats such as Kim Stanley Robinson and Asomiv.

The style of interchanging stories with historical aspects, as well as some of the style did remind me of Murakami, but I have no idea if this is being literature racist as this is the only other Asian book I have read other than those by Murakami.

It also had echoes of Neal Stephenson in that it was an intricate and baroque plot full of subterfuges and technical writing.

But maybe I'm just projecting two of my favourite authors onto another book that I enjoyed. So here is one reader that is converted to the forthcoming volumes and possibly converted to reading more international SF.

Both Stanislaw Lem and the Strugatsky brothers failed to take my interest, but Liu Cixin has managed to produce something that I really did enjoy and also made me think big thoughts.

September Reread: Nothing has changed, but I put my star rating up. It is a special read that I enjoyed just as much the second time around.

Yes, there were very little surprises, but I appreciated the pacing and understood more about the characters and the history. I saved my reading of Book 2 and 3 until they were all out.

I'm too old and there are too many other books to read to have to reread a series each time a new volume comes out. See you all for for Book 2 review.

View all 27 comments. Shelves: not-can-us-or-uk , favourites , sci-fi , sff-award-winners. I just spent a week with this hard science fiction, Hugo-award winning novel from Chinese author Cixin Liu and I have to admit: I'm impressed.

The Three-Body Problem had me putting off tasks to pick it up, stuck with me throughout my day, and was always a pleasure to read when I sat down with it.

Indeed, this review seeks to help an intrigued rea I just spent a week with this hard science fiction, Hugo-award winning novel from Chinese author Cixin Liu and I have to admit: I'm impressed.

Indeed, this review seeks to help an intrigued reader decide if this book would be a good fit for them and their reading taste.

Hard Sci-Fi The premise of The Three-Body Problem is that an alien civilization receives a message from a Chinese scientist in the s and plans to come to Earth, naturally, for a good old-fashioned invasion.

I know, I know. This novel revels in its appreciation of science and a bit of brushing up on introductory physics would not go amiss.

Cixin Liu and his translator, Ken Liu does a fantastic job in explaining basic and high-level science concepts in clear language.

Although there were times in which I had to set the book down to interpret, these moments were largely towards the end of the book where the science gets really out there.

I was also less than impressed with the video game within the book that serves as an introduction to the alien civilization.

Roughly, each time the game is booted up the player is greeted by an ever-advancing Earth-based representation of scientific progress.

So, at first you meet an ancient Chinese king, but eventually you hang out with Einstein. This grew on me after the first few chapters set in the game.

Liu uses these sections to convey the difficulty of the scientific problem at hand, show reverence for science history, and introduce the civilization in an innocuous way.

The first pages deal mostly with the Chinese Cultural Revolution. Of course, as the novel goes on it does an excellent job of weaving together the threads from the Cultural Revolution and the impending invasion.

Where other novels skim over the nitty-gritty of the science behind spectacle, The Three-Body Problem spends pages making sure the reader knows what to expect.

This never feels obnoxious; on the contrary, it is refreshing to see an author convey a concept in such understandable language. Though the novel alternates between the time of discovery during the Chinese Cultural Revolution and the present day story, it never feels random.

There are stretches where I spent 50 pages in the present, took a brief 10 page detour into the past, only to return for a lengthy bit set in the present.

The story unfolds rather than following a strictly predictable path. Instead of predictability, it seems guided by logic.

This all makes for a read that is compelling because it makes the reader feel as if they are hot on the pursuit of the central mystery.

Instead of driving the plot, Wang reacts to it. I never felt that the decisions he makes in the novel were guided by his belief system.

The Three-Body Problem genuinely makes the case for having a fairly empty lead. Of course, there are two more novels in the series that will delve further into the impressive, exciting, and pessimistic world that Liu has created.

You can find my review of The Dark Forest here! View all 18 comments. Dec 23, Samantha rated it it was ok. While this is obviously a masterpiece of hard sci-fi, that is also the reason I had a hard time connecting to it.

While the science behind it all is complex and interesting, I found myself glazing over many a time and detaching from the story.

The characters didn't feel real to me. Aside from that, this is a book I'd love to discuss with others because I wonder how much of this book was harder for me due to cultural and historical differences I wasn't even aware of while reading.

I think I have While this is obviously a masterpiece of hard sci-fi, that is also the reason I had a hard time connecting to it. I think I have discovered that hard sci-fi is not for me, as I need more of a connection to the story and characters, but I'd recommend this for any science buff.

View all 6 comments. I'm really waffling between whether to rate "did not like it" vs. I've consciously created a "not my cup of tea" shelf for this very book, however, because a lot of people seem to have liked it.

Is this what hard SF is like? In which case, it reminds me of similar "I am completely unable to get interested in this" proble I'm really waffling between whether to rate "did not like it" vs.

In which case, it reminds me of similar "I am completely unable to get interested in this" problems I had with Kim Stanley Robinson last year.

I actually started this book months ago, but wasn't feeling it after the first chapter and stopped. I picked it up again now, stubbornly ploughing through because of the Hugos, and I kept waiting for it to suddenly turn around and wow me, but Learning more about the Chinese Cultural Revolution was fascinating, and I liked seeing its colossal effects on Ye, plus the feeling of 'science will save us' that permeates the society.

Liu Cixin's imagination of an alien society was really good and unique dehydrate! Da Shi is, hands-down, the best character of this entire book.

I much rather wanted to read his tales of fighting crime, with his seedy, no-bullshit, 'I'm not a good cop, but I'm a great cop' approach.

He livened up every scene he was in! Instead, this was so much like reading a physics textbook. That's about where my praise ends, because I prefer emotional character-driven plots with some action, whereas this is a science-driven impersonal plod.

Who the hell is Wang, our protagonist? After one single scene with his wife and son! He's just the viewfinder through which we see information unfold -- and unfold it does, with just reams and reams of exposition and info-dumps.

The prose is dull. I didn't so much mind it being stilted, and the dialogue carrying the remnants of its original language a conscious effort on the translator Ken Liu's part , but it's just such a trudging plod.

I highlighted a few more poetic passages that I really liked, but for the most part it leans more to clinical and dry. I really liked the virtual reality chapters, but after all that buildup, I feel like it just fizzles out and absolutely, literally, nothing has been accomplished by the end of the book.

With where the plot goes, the entire book honestly just feels like a prologue for the sequel. I feel like the Goodreads blurb was pretty awfully off-base, touting that it has "the scope of Dune and the commercial action of Independence Day ".

Without characters with real depth to get attached to, I just never got hooked into this book. Specifically: view spoiler [I'm talking about the rebels turning against all of humanity, to the extent of campaigning for the deaths of themselves and their own children.

And this is a widespread movement?? We're such a selfish, self-centered, survival-oriented species that I just don't believe it.

I mean, I get the point. I get that it's about humans pitted against humans, and the divisive cracks that can tear us apart even without the physical presence of an Other.

But man, I just couldn't bring myself to care. I'm so sorry, Cixin. I wanted to love it. Nov 17, David Brin rated it it was amazing.

The Three-Body Problem is part one of an award-winning trilogy by Liu Cixin — and is arguably the best Chinese science fiction novel ever translated into English.

The series explores the world of the Trisolarans, a race that is forced to adapt to life in a triple star system, on a planet whose gravity, heat, and orbit are in constant flux.

Facing The Three-Body Problem is part one of an award-winning trilogy by Liu Cixin — and is arguably the best Chinese science fiction novel ever translated into English.

Take a look at Stephan Martiniere's way-cool cover for the coming Tor Books edition! If so, the good news stretches beyond China!

View all 7 comments. Aug 18, Lyn rated it liked it. I liked this and there is no doubt that this is a science heavy, brilliantly produced and contemplated, highly original SF novel from a physics understanding Chinese author that was good enough to win a slew of awards including the Hugo.

But I like to watch Ridiculousness. I like Travis McGee. Beer and pizza and a bug zapper is quality entertainment. Liu begins in the late 60s during the Chinese Cultural Revolution and then moves forward in time to a near future where a strange virtual reality game replicates an even stranger reality.

And the aliens. Maybe I would have liked this more if I were a physicist. Sheldon Cooper. If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

Excuse me? It's like saying, "look here, this is my universe, but try not to concentrate too much on it, look at all the beautiful metaphors I wrote instead.

In this case, base physics is quite off base, i. Even with poetical license in play, this is quite a bit of a stretch.

If you're into crappy SF, read the rest elsewhere. This Hugo Award winning SF novel by Chinese author Liu Cixin is delightfully intelligent and complex, and I really appreciated the authentic Chinese characters in the story and the insights into China's history and culture.

The novel is also a little slow and dry in parts, with a certain formality that I would guess echoes the original Chinese writing style.

I also had some trouble keeping all of the characters straight in my head; most of the characters have Chinese names, and the names tende This Hugo Award winning SF novel by Chinese author Liu Cixin is delightfully intelligent and complex, and I really appreciated the authentic Chinese characters in the story and the insights into China's history and culture.

It begins in the s, during the Cultural Revolution and its aftermath. A respected professor is beaten to death by three young women who are Red Guards, and his astrophysicist daughter, Ye Wenjie, is eventually shipped off to a remote mountaintop where a government-sponsored group is secretly exploring the possibility of electronic communication with aliens.

Eventually it actually works - but there's a clear possibility of danger to all of humanity. Ye Wenjie makes a fateful decision.

This novel is not going to be every reader's cuppa tea, but I think readers who like intricately plotted hard VERY hard SF novels should definitely give this series a try.

I flailed and almost gave up when I hit some chapters that involve lengthy, detailed descriptions of a video game, a very odd role-playing game on an alien world yet with human characters.

But I powered through, and once all the pieces started fitting together, it got fascinating. I'm up for book 2! Full review to come. View all 13 comments.

Feb 23, Apatt rated it really liked it Shelves: sci-fi. One of my favorite ways of choosing a book by an unfamiliar author to read is by the buzz from sf blogs and discussion forums.

About the official synopsis, I am surprised how much spoiler is in it. I am glad I did not read the synopsis until I was half way through the book, but even then I wish I had finished the book before reading the thing.

This is beginning of her disdain for the entire human race and a later betrayal by a friend which leads to her agreeing to join a top secret Government science project which has will have a great impact on the future of humanity.

About forty years later Wang Miao a nanomaterial researcher stumbles upon a VR game that seems to have surprising real world consequences.

OK, a little bit of a spoiler now. I think even the kitchen sink is mentioned at one point! The Three-Body Problem is a huge bestseller in China, it is the first book of a trilogy only this first volume translated and published internationally so far and a film adaptation is in the making by Chinese film makers, not Hollywood — yet.

Considering the hype I am surprising how divisive this book is, it has all the things most hard SF fans normally want, the plausible science, the cool tech, huge ideas etc.

I suspect the dislike among some of the readers is due to the book's initial focus on the Cultural Revolution in the 60s.

If you read sci-fi just for the sci-fi and you don't want to know about this part of Chinese history this substantial part of the book may bore you.

I know nothing about this history and I personally found it to be very interesting. There are also some lengthy scientific expositions which are a little hard to follow.

I love the cyberspace world or metaverse of this book, it is bizarre and fascinating; how it impacts the real world is more reminiscent of Philip K.

Dick than William Gibson. This does not make him a better author than Clarke though, Clarke was a master storyteller who told some ingenious stories with much more economy and clarity of vision.

So given the divisive opinions of this book I would recommend it with caution that you try a sample chapter first if possible, or at least read a few trusted reviews.

Also, the book is not an easy breezy read, there are passages that will tax your brain and others that require your patience.

Personally I would love to find out what happen in the subsequent volumes of the trilogy. Get on with it Mr. Ken Liu! Both the ocean and the iceberg are made of the same material.

That the iceberg seems separate is only because it is in a different form. In reality, it is but a part of the vast ocean.

Sci-fi is one of my favourite genres, but I have to admit that sometimes books in this category can be a little "superficial" and mainly for entertainment purposes.

I believe this author reached peaks comparable to Asimov with this work! What a ride! A true work of genius. As for the three different settings of the book, the contemporary one, the historical one set during the chinese revolution and the "sci-fi" one of which I am not going to talk to prevent spoilers , I was intrigued by the first, extremely interested in the second, and absolutely mesmerized by the third.

The length of the novel and the ability of the writer created a world so well-built and immersive that I felt catapulted in an other dimension.

Until now, only a few sci-fi books have given me a similar experience, and they are all "classics".

I truly believe this one to be a modern classic already. Finally, the richness of the purely sci-fi aspect of it, is so imaginative and revolutionary that I am sure I will think about it for years to come.

Some sections of it reminded me of pioneer texts like Flatland if you've read both books, I am pretty sure you know of which part I am talking about.

I would like to write more, but really I don't want to spoil this experience to anyone! I can only recommend with the greatest enthusiasm to read this book as soon as possible!

Can't wait to go on with the series. View all 8 comments. Jun 26, TS Chan rated it really liked it Shelves: physical-owned. This critically well-acclaimed science fiction novel certainly deserves its laurels.

From what I can gather after reading this book, I already wholeheartedly agree. The Three-Body Problem is a truly unique and original science fiction within the realm of plausibility.

Melding real-world science, history, philosophy, religion and fantastical ideas, this novel delivers a beautifully-written and tr 4.

Melding real-world science, history, philosophy, religion and fantastical ideas, this novel delivers a beautifully-written and translated narrative which engages the mind, heart and soul.

The story starts against the backdrop of the brutal Chinese Cultural Revolution, which afforded a highly relatable and realistic basis for its central plot.

The narrative combines both present time events and flashbacks to provide the backstory of a major character who suffered through that bloodshed period.

Characterisation might take a slight backseat to the plot development, but I enjoyed the unfolding of the story together with the scientific bits so much that it did not become an issue for me.

It is also actually quite frightening how much I identify with the ideology presented in this thought-provoking novel.

Is humanity worth salvation with the destructiveness it presents to this wondrous planet? Even if God were here, it wouldn't do any good.

I opted to write a shorter review for this simply because part of my enjoyment was derived from knowing as little as possible.

It was timely that I recently had the impetus to read up on theoretical and astrophysics as this helped my little understanding of the science in the novel.

Having said that, one does not need to really know or fully comprehend the technical details to appreciate the story.

However, if you are a fan of science, fiction or otherwise, who will love to see the application of these fundamental theories in a captivating story, do yourself a favour and pick up this book sooner than later.

I will also like to thank my wonderful friend, Celeste, for gifting me with the hardcover copy of this stunning book for my physical collection.

Apr 06, Rachel the Book Harlot rated it liked it Shelves: science-fiction. It has been nominated for numerous awards, including a Hugo Award for Best Novel.

Does it deserve all the hype? In some respects I can see why it has garnered so much praise. The science is fun, there are some interesting philosophical concepts, and the world-building is also interesting.

However, that for me is where the praise ends. Where the book fails is in the basic fundamen 2. Where the book fails is in the basic fundamentals of what makes a good story: writing, characterization, pacing, and plot.

Harsh, I know. The characters are flat, the writing is lifeless and choppy, the pacing is slow as molasses in some places, and some of the dialogue is downright terrible.

There are instances where the author awkwardly uses dialogue to info dump: "Professor Wang, we want to know if you've had any recent contacts with members of the Frontiers of Science," the young cop said.

Why can't I have contact with a legal international academic group? Strange and awkward. Despite these problems, the story does start out interesting enough with the character of Ye Wenjie during the Chinese Revolution.

However, it later jumps to the modern day, through the point of view character of Wang Miao, where its problems can no longer be ignored and the story fizzles.

Perhaps it is unfair of me to heap such harsh criticism at the writing since this is a translation from the original Chinese.

Maybe these issues do not appear in the original? I cannot be sure, and if someone has read the original I'd love to hear your thoughts.

But, as it stands I can only go with the version I've read. Sorry, book. You had some interesting elements, but not enough to overlook the problems.

Final Rating: 2. In an afterword, Liu expresses his opinion that science fiction should not be used to make social commentary but should instead restrict itself to playing with ideas of science and technology.

I was surprised to see that because Three Body had struck me tentatively, since I know little about China as an especially Chinese novel, with much to say about how societies should be organised.

Whether you accept his protestations or not is unlikely to affect your enjoyment of the novel, which blends historical tragedy with the kind of slow-burning first contact story that harks back to the golden age of the s and '50s in the US.

Perhaps the most fascinating scenes in the book, and certainly the eeriest, are those set within a virtual-reality computer game which is concerned with the practical implications of the three-body problem in physics; these chapters seem grand and bleak and impressively inhuman in scope.

Less successful, perhaps, are the interpersonal relationships and the motivations of the characters in general.

The plot hinges on the assumption that, faced with a particular challenge to their scientific and existential ideas, vast numbers of people would deliberately opt for suicide, both personally and in terms of trying to destroy their entire species.

This seemed a little infeasible to me, though perhaps it's just a more Chinese way of looking at things.

Either way, it makes for a curious and unusual plot. An interesting companion read might be Adam Roberts's Yellow Blue Tibia , which used first contact as a way of writing about Stalin's Russia.

The translation, from the unrelated Ken Liu, is excellent on a sentence-by-sentence level, though apparently he rearranged some of the chapters for an English-speaking audience, which I can't say I approve of.

View 2 comments. ARC received via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review The Three-Body Problem is a very successful trilogy in China and is now translated and published in English for the first time.

We're following two main characters over two different time periods. The first is Ye Wenjie who witnesses the death of her father, a scientist, during the cultural revolution in China during the s.

A scientis herself she then gets the chance to participate in a high security project for the government, despite ARC received via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review The Three-Body Problem is a very successful trilogy in China and is now translated and published in English for the first time.

A scientis herself she then gets the chance to participate in a high security project for the government, despite her anti-government attitude.

Our second protagonist is Wang Miao, also a scientist, who lives in modern times and gets involved with a police investigation related to some strange suicides in the scientific community.

During the course of the investigation, Wang discovers a mysterious video game called The Three-Body Problem and starts to play it.

How Ye, Wang and the game are connected will get clear during the novel. The book reads a lot like a thriller and the SF elements are rare, but when they happen they always have significance.

While reading it, the book hovered around 3,5 - 4 stars for me for a long time. But in the end the book offers you some clues and if you can connect those, you're going to see what a well constructed piece of art the novel is.

It is one of those books that really functions on a meta level and you need to do a little bit of analysis and interpretation to get the full level of enjoyment out of it.

With its symbolism in numbers it reminded me a lot of reading Steven Erikson's Malazan Book of the Fallen series, cause he constructs his stories in a similar way and the reader has a bit of work to do.

But I personally enjoy those engaging reads and The Three-Body Problem was a book I often set aside after finishing a chapter to think about it and that is always a good sign for a great reading experience.

In the end, this was a clear 5 star book for me and I'm really looking forward to the release of the second book in Jun 21, Stuart rated it really liked it Shelves: near-future , favorites , hard-sf , alien-contact.

The Three-Body Problem: Particle physics, the rise and fall of civilizations, and alien contact Originally published at Fantasy Literature The Three-Body Problem was first published in China back in and translated into English in It got a lot of attention and was put on the Hugo Award ballot this year when another author pulled out.

So after listening to the audiobook during a trip to the East Coast I realized I couldn The Three-Body Problem: Particle physics, the rise and fall of civilizations, and alien contact Originally published at Fantasy Literature The Three-Body Problem was first published in China back in and translated into English in This book is impossible to discuss without significant spoilers, so if you are interested in it since it was put on the Hugo ballot, or you like hard-SF alien contact stories, or you just want to see what the most popular Chinese SF book is about, then read no further and get the book.

It is well worth your time. A detailed discussion of the plot with unavoidable spoilers has been placed at the end of this review.

The Three-Body Problem is split into three main narratives: 1 The backstory of scientist Ye Wenjie, who grew up during the madness of the Cultural Revolution and saw her father killed for his scientific ideas.

She ends up grudgingly working at a secret military facility in the s dedicated to making alien contact, but never has trust in humanity after suffering various betrayals.

His tale takes up the bulk of the book, and for much of the novel both he and the reader are in the dark as to what is going on.

The further he gets involved with the secretive group The Frontiers of Science, the more he realizes that there are numerous conspiracies occurring, all involving scientists, alien contact, and a mysterious game called Three Body.

To survive this, the aliens develop the ability to dehydrate and wait until the next stable era. However, these eras are so unpredictable that civilizations have already been destroyed, but still they try to advance their scientific knowledge in order to solve the Three-Body Problem.

Overall, I thought The Three-Body Problem was chock full of cool ideas about science but was fairly weak in characterization, particularly the main character Wang Miao, who is a fairly passive guy who serves to move the story forward.

Ye Wenjie is much more complex, and her betrayal of humanity is believable considering what she has suffered.

I liked the cynical and profane cop Shi Quang best, as he continually ridicules the milque-toast concerns of Wang Miao and the other scientists who seem very quick to commit suicide when their experimental results go haywire.

The most poorly executed part of the book was the virtual reality game Three Body, as it was so unclear about who was controlling the avatars, what the purpose of the game was, who created it, and whether the human participants were actually able to affect the outcome.

Moreover, it was hard to believe that anyone would like to play such an esoteric and turgid game. Perhaps these mysteries have been left there deliberately to be revealed in the later books, but it was a bit confusing and took up a lot more pages than necessary.

Not to mention that the Trisolarans themselves are fascinating and their motivations for invasion are fairly believable, even if I question why they need bother if they have the power to create sophons.

The writing sounded natural and the lack of embellished language is almost certainly the style of Cixin Liu, considering his interest in particle physics and admiration for Arthur C.

Notably, the second book is being translated by Joel Martinsen, so it will be interesting to see what he brings to the story.

I noticed that the narrators for the next book are also different, so both translator and narrator are not the same. I will definitely be looking forward to the next installment, The Dark Forest, which will be available on Audible on Aug 11, Seeing this, Ye is forever after distrustful of other people, but her scientific ability makes her indispensible at the secret military facility called Red Coast, which initially hides the fact that they are seeking signs of alien life in the stars.

Meanwhile, Wang Miao is pressured by Chinese authorities, including a gruff and cynical police officer named Shi Quang, to infiltrate the Frontiers of Science to find out why so many prominent scientists have been committing suicide.

He discovers that they have been encountering strange and impossible results in their study of fundamental particles, and when he is suddenly faced with seeing a ghostly countdown showing up in photos he takes but which are visible to nobody else, he starts to doubt his own sanity.

Meanwhile, in the course of his investigations, he finds out that many of the scientists are playing the Three Body game, so he also goes down the proverbial rabbit hole to find out what is happening.

The Three Body game itself is supposedly a massive multi-player online game, but each time Wang plays it he only encounters a few other avatars, mainly famous scientists from the past like Isaac Newton, John Von Neumann, and Albert Einstein.

These scientists are trying to use their theories to solve the Three Body Problem that plagues the kingdom of the game, and each time they come up with a solution, another chaotic era wipes out the kingdom and civilization again.

This part of the story occupies a lot of the book, but it is also the most unclearly described and least believable. The rise and fall of the kingdoms is more of a metaphor for the rise and fall of civilizations and societies that mankind has undergone in fact, some Chinese readers apparently have seen a parallel with the rise and fall of Internet companies in the cut-throat business world of today.

We then shift back to the story of Wang, as he discovers a group called the Adventists who, if I understood this correctly, sympathize with the aliens and welcome their invasion of earth as saviors to cure corrupt humanity.

The government officials who contacted Wang are trying to combat this group of pro-alien, anti-humanity fanatics. The Adventists have apparently gotten hold of much more data from the aliens, and have formed a quasi-cult dedicated to welcoming them.

Meanwhile, there is also the rise of various anti-scientific and environmental terrorist groups that seem determined to undermine scientific progress.

Clarke becomes most clear. The aliens are called Trisolarans, after the three suns of their system, and the game Three Body essentially describes their history.

The book never spells out the relationship, but I think that the only possible way that the Three Body game could mirror Trisolaran society so closely is if the aliens had shared this information with humans, who then designed the game to introduce the Three Body Problem, either to crowd-source possible solutions to it, or to build sympathy among humans for the Trisolaran plight, as they continually struggle to survive every chaotic cycle.

As it turns out, the Trisolarans have been seeking for generations a way to either solve their Three Body Problem or to find another planetary system to escape to, so when they receive the initial signal from Red Coast, the first Trisolaran monitor realizes that if humans establish contact they will be tracked down and conquered.

This is a nice parallel story to Ye Wenjie, who betrays humanity in favor of the aliens. So once the Trisolarans receive the message of Ye, they pinpoint the location of Earth and quickly assemble an invasion fleet.

The reader might wonder why they are so aggressive, but the book suggests that the brutal conditions the Trisolarans have faced throughout their history precludes any form of cooperation in favor of conquest, that old chestnut of lebensraum used by the Nazis to justify their invasions.

The Trisolarans are not content just to send an invasion fleet, so instead they devote their resources to particle physics, namely unfolding protons to two dimensions in order to create a planet-sized mirror upon which they etch micro-circuitry using the strong nuclear force and mesons to conduct data.

They then shrink this down to three dimensions and make a new construct called a sohpon, which is essentially a massive computer shrunk to the size of a proton, which can then be sent across space at the speed of light and is used to infiltrate the particle physics accelerators used by the researchers back on Earth.

It seems so implausible, but since The Three-Body Problem is a trilogy, I imagine dedicated readers will find out more as the story progresses.

However, it will take years for the alien invasion fleet to arrive at Earth, which gives humanity quite a time span to prepare a defense.

View all 29 comments. How would humanity react if we found out we are not alone in the universe? Not only that, if we knew that alien civilization was on its way to earth to invade our planet?

How would we react? How would YOU react? The Three-Body Problem is a unique sci-fi novel set in China. It takes place over several time periods from the 's to present time.

The story begins during the Chinese Cultural Revolution in the late 's, and focuses on how the intellectual society was hard-pressed and assaulted.

Those who were not killed were humiliated and sent to labor camps to be 'reformed'. This part of the story follows the life of Ye Wenjie.

An astrophysicist and one of the intellectuals sent to be reformed. Ye Wenjie's experiences during this time are sad and lonely, but lead her to play a key role in the future of earth.

Er warnt sie, dass sie nicht antworten soll. Verlag Head of Netflix Abmelden Ltd. Prior to becoming a writer, Liu worked as an engineer in a power plant in Yangquan. Read the award-winning, The Neighborhood acclaimed, multi-million-copy-selling science-fiction phenomenon - soon to be a Netflix Original Series from the Tv Record Online of Game of Thrones. Read More Read Less. Three Body Problem

Retrieved February 21, Nanfang Metropolis Daily in Chinese. Locus Online. Kirkus Reviews. October 15, Retrieved June 10, Retrieved June 24, Netflix Media Center.

Retrieved September 1, Hugo Award for Best Novel. The Sword in the Stone by T. White Slan by A. Heinlein Fahrenheit by Ray Bradbury Miller, Jr.

Clarke The Dispossessed by Ursula K. Le Guin Vinge Downbelow Station by C. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by J.

Jemisin The Obelisk Gate by N. Jemisin The Stone Sky by N. Liu Cixin. Categories : novels science fiction novels 21st-century Chinese novels Chinese science fiction novels Alien invasions in novels Hugo Award for Best Novel-winning works Alpha Centauri in fiction Books about the Cultural Revolution Chinese novels adapted into films Novels about communism.

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Download as PDF Printable version. Remembrance of Earth's Past. Science fiction , Alien invasion. Chongqing Press. San 1 t'i 3.

Saam 1 tai 2. Awarded [4]. Awarded [11]. Nominated [12]. Nominated [13]. Nominated [14]. Campbell Memorial Award. Nominated [15]. Awarded [16]. Awarded [17].

Nominated [18]. The chart begins on March 9, , when the Fed launched its first QE program. Over the past eight and a half years , Quality has been absolutely useless as an investment derivative.

Have the Quality stocks in your portfolio gone up over the past eight and a half years? So in the summer of , when Portugal and Italy were both looking like deadbeat countries, they had to pay investors a much higher rate of interest than the U.

Those are enormous spreads in the world of sovereign debt! This chart begins in the summer of , when the ECB announced its intentions to prop up the European sovereign debt market directly.

This is nuts. No country is that good! Below is the spread between Greek year sovereign bonds and U. Per year! For ten years. To Greece. Or it might matter again in eight months.

A Three-Body System is a chaotic system. As the boilerplate says, past performance is not a guarantee of future results. In fact, the only thing I can promise you is that past performance will NEVER give you a predictive algorithm for future results in a chaotic system.

This is basis uncertainty. This is the biggest concern that every investor should have, that the signals derivatives and processes algorithms that we ALL use to make sense of the investing world are no longer connected to security prices.

What do we DO in a chaotic system? What does that even mean, to say that we are investors in a chaotic system?

I think that risk balancing strategies make a ton of sense in a chaotic system, so that we think first about budgeting our risk agnostically across geographies and asset classes and sectors, and secondarily think about budgeting our dollars.

Keep in mind that our maximum regret may not be ruinous loss! I know plenty of people whose maximum regret is not keeping up with the Joneses.

The point being that we need to be painfully honest with ourselves about our sources of regret and target our investments accordingly. Third, I think we should reconsider our approach to computer-directed investment strategies.

The brains of both bees and humans are hard-wired for algorithms. Every bee in the world will follow its hard-wired algorithms even unto death.

And most humans will, too. But humans have the capacity to think beyond their biological and cultural programming … if they work at it. Where do we lose good people?

A chaotic system like markets, yes, but also a chaotic system like politics. The Answer is, by nature, totalitarian.

But if we care about liberty. If we care about justice. If we care about liberty and justice for all … we have to resist The Answer.

This commentary is being provided to you as general information only and should not be taken as investment advice. The opinions expressed in these materials represent the personal views of the author s.

It is not investment research or a research recommendation, as it does not constitute substantive research or analysis.

Any action that you take as a result of information contained in this document is ultimately your responsibility. Epsilon Theory will not accept liability for any loss or damage, including without limitation to any loss of profit, which may arise directly or indirectly from use of or reliance on such information.

Consult your investment advisor before making any investment decisions. It must be noted, that no one can accurately predict the future of the market with certainty or guarantee future investment performance.

Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. ET Live! The Three-Body Problem. Login as a Paid Member.

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Inline Feedbacks. In this case, the thing moving lose energy, and this make calculation more difficult.

Experts say that the system is "not conservative ". Experts in another field called Quantum mechanics , say, in addition, at high speed the creation and annihilation of particles becomes possible, so, it is not possible to keep the number of particles constant.

There is no relativistic solution that always works for the movement of two or three things. The three-body problem also happens in astronomy.

The problem consists in calculating the course of three bodies, that influence each other with gravitation.

The first to state the problem was Isaac Newton , in Principia. Usually, two of the bodies are large, and the third is small.

In the case where the two bodies have the same gravitational force, and that the bodies all have the same mass can be solved exactly. If this is not the case, the problem is solved through iteration and approximation.

Many different patterns of motion can occur.

Three Body Problem - Head of Zeus Ltd.

Marion Raab , Thalia-Buchhandlung Nürnberg. Weitere Bewertungen einblenden Weniger Bewertungen einblenden. Kategorien : Literarisches Werk Literatur Der Bahnverlauf dieser drei Sonnen ist nicht präzise vorherzusagen und die auf Trisolaris entstehenden Zivilisationen werden dadurch ein ums andere Mal vernichtet.

Three Body Problem Weitere Formate

Ohne Anmeldung wird Ihre Rezension anonym veröffentlicht. Weitere Bewertungen einblenden Weniger Bewertungen einblenden. Macmillan USA Fr. Prior to becoming a writer, Liu worked as an engineer in a power plant in Yangquan. KNV Besorgung Das Dschungelbuch 2019. Prior to becoming a writer, Liu His Online as an engineer in a power plant in Yangquan. Head of Zeus Ltd. Ring Smart Home Security Systems. Amazon Payment Products. Über eBooks bei Thalia ✓»The Three-Body Problem / The Remembrance of Earth's Past 1«von Cixin Liu & weitere eBooks online kaufen & direkt. Das Buch Cixin Liu: The Three-Body Problem 1 jetzt portofrei für 8,78 Euro kaufen. Mehr von Cixin Liu gibt es im Shop. The Three-Body Problem 1 von Cixin Liu Taschenbuch bei naturegraphics.eu bestellen. ✓ Bis zu 70% günstiger als Neuware ✓ Top Qualität ✓ Gratis Versand ab. The Three-Body Problem (Remembrance of Earth's Past) von Cixin Liu Taschenbuch bei naturegraphics.eu bestellen. PillPack Pharmacy Tupu. Weitere Empfehlungen einblenden Weniger Empfehlungen einblenden. This singular event will shape not only the rest of her life but also the future of mankind. Book 1 of 3. His collection, The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories, has been published in more than a dozen languages. Sie reflektiert ihre Entscheidungen der Vergangenheit und realisiert, dass die Menschheit von nun an anders sein wird. Alexa Sick Boy Deutsch Analytics for the Web. Prior to becoming a writer, Liu worked as an engineer in a power plant in Yangquan.

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